What’s Happening for October   no comments

Posted at 2:07 am in the places I would like to go

Communities

Jackson County board’s plan to have sheriff in their debt backfired, say some political observers

Article source: http://www.sunherald.com/2014/09/27/5823408/whats-happening-for-october-updated.html

Written by enfoquec on September 29th, 2014

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Why Oman is the destination you should visit now   no comments

Posted at 2:07 am in the places I would like to go

Oman is stunning.
Source: Supplied




WHILE the United Arab Emirates draws international visitors to its flashy five-star hotels and massive shopping malls, its neighbour to the east, Oman, has taken a slightly more subtle approach to developing its tourism industry.


Oman is hoping that the preservation of its heritage sites and spectacular landscapes — rather than rapid modernisation of both — will attract visitors seeking a more laid back Arabian experience.

The capital, Muscat, may not have many towering glass skyscrapers, but that doesn’t mean that visitors to this Gulf nation have to rough it.

Oman has a wealth of luxury experiences that provide modern comforts in a unique Middle Eastern setting.

The dramatic landscape. Picture: Lucio Andretto
Source: Flickr




1. The Chedi, Muscat

Muscat’s waterfront has a charming promenade next to the city’s old Matrouh souk, perfect for a sunset stroll. The bazaar next door is small, but has narrow alleys lined with carpet and spice vendors, and is one of the most authentic in the Middle East.

The beachfront Chedi Hotel, just west of the old city, is one of Muscat’s best. Built in traditional Omani style and with a bright white facade, its 182 rooms and high ceilings offer an atmosphere of palatial grandeur.

The Chedi’s narrow infinity pool, which the hotel claims is the longest pool in all of Oman, stretches to the Indian Ocean and is major draw.

The Chedi Muscat; North Ghubra 32, Way No. 3215, Street No. 46, Muscat; +968 2452 4400

Pool at Chedi Muscat Hotel in the city of Muscat.
Source: Supplied




2. Royal Opera House

Abu Dhabi and Doha may be building world-class museums like the Louvre and the Guggenheim, but Muscat is the only city on the Arabian Peninsula with its own opera house.

Oman’s ruler, Sultan Qaboos bin Said, opened the Royal Opera House Muscat in 2011. The main hall seats around 1000 and regularly stages concerts, ballets and theatrical productions.

It has hosted international artists such as Placido Domingo and the London Symphony Orchestra.

The beautifully constructed building itself is worth a visit even if you can’t catch a show; it blends traditional Omani design with modern acoustic technology and is one of the most recognisable sights in Muscat.

Royal Opera House Muscat; Al Kharjiyah St., Muscat; +968 2440 3300

The Royal Opera House. Picture: Prasad Pillai
Source: Flickr




3. The Green Mountain

No visit to Oman would be complete without seeing the stunning views from the top of Jabal Akhdar, located at nearly 3048 meters up in the Hajar Mountain range. It’s just a short drive from the capital.

Jabal Akhdar, whose name means “green mountain” in Arabic, is covered with trees and shrubs in an otherwise mostly desert landscape. With its mild temperatures year-round, Jabal Akhdar is the perfect retreat for visitors looking for outdoor adventure or an off-road trek.

Tourists can discover Oman’s green mountain from the comforts of a newly built five-star hilltop resort. The luxurious Alila Jabal Akhdar opened earlier this year, and offers a pool, spa and 86 rooms with sweeping views of the mountains.

Alila Jabal Akhdar; Plot No. 4 Al Roose, Jabal Al Akhdar, Nizwa; +968 2534 4200

Alila Jabal Akhdar has opened this year.
Source: Supplied




4. Zighy Bay

Located just north of the United Arab Emirates, the small enclave of Musandam is one of the most geographically unique areas in Gulf region.

For centuries, only boats could access the traditional Omani fishing villages that dot the coastline of this mountainous peninsula.

But a new dirt road built over the jagged cliffs now allows for land access to Zighy Bay, a secluded cove that has a stunning stretch of white-sand beach.

Zighy Bay is also home to a Six Senses resort with more than 80 villas, many with their own private pools. The resort offers the region’s most unique way to get to a hotel room: parasailing from a rocky overlook 1,000 feet above.

Six Senses Zighy Bay; Musandam Peninsula; Dibba Bayeh, Oman; +968 2673 5555

Dinner table setting overlooking Zighy Bay.
Source: Supplied




5. Sailing explorations

Centuries ago, Omanis dominated the Indian Ocean and earned a reputation as the best seafarers in the world. Omani sailors like the legendary Sinbad used wooden dhows to expand their Gulf sultanate’s reach as far south as Zanzibar in East Africa.

Today, the government is hoping that its maritime heritage will draw tourists to its own shores.

“Oman’s dramatic coastline with its secluded coves, beautifully sandy beaches, enchanting islands and rich marine life is undoubtedly best explored by sea,” says Oman Sail’s Ghada Al-Said.

Oman Sail is a government-funded project that teaches Omani children modern sailing techniques. It also offers bespoke charter packages for tourists, from sunset cruises to overnight yacht tours.

Oman Sail; 18th November St., The Wave Muscat, Muscat; +968 2418 1400

Get out on the water.
Source: Supplied




6. Wahiba Sands

Camping under the stars in the desert is a favourite Omani pastime and Wahiba Sands is one of the favourite locations to do it — a rejuvenating desert retreat far from Muscat, where Bedouin tour guides offer desert safaris and overnight camping treks.

The 1000 Nights Camps may be the most exclusive “hotel” in the entire desert. The rooms are large air-conditioned tents that have all the amenities of most five-star hotels: bathrooms, televisions and even a refrigerated minibar.

1000 Nights Camps; Mandinat Al Sultan Qaboos, Oman; +968 9944 8158

Enjoy some time in the desert.
Source: News Corp Australia




7. Shuwa

One of the most popular dishes in Oman is called shuwa, succulent lamb served with spice-infused rice.

Preparing shuwa typically involves slaughtering a sheep, marinating the meat with coriander, black pepper, cumin and cardamom, and then slow-cooking the morsels in an underground sand oven with charcoal.

The whole process can take a full day, which is why shuwa is typically served as a feast only on Omani holidays and special occasions.

There are several high-end restaurants in Muscat that serve home-cooked shuwa within minutes of ordering. One of the better ones is called Kargeen, a family-style restaurant with outdoor garden seating low to the ground in typical Omani fashion.

Kargeen; Al Bashair St., Muscat; +968 2469 9055

Shuwa is popular in Oman. Picture: A TripAdvisor traveller
Source: Supplied




This article was written by Jon Jensen from CNN and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

There are more stunning spots in Oman. Picture: Andries3
Source: Flickr




Sultan’s Palace complex with Al-Jalali fort in Old Muscat, Oman.
Source: Supplied




A dramatic sunset. Picture: Mark Hills
Source: Flickr




There is also luxury.
Source: Supplied




On the edge. Picture: Marc Veraart
Source: Flickr




View from above. Picture: Mark Hills
Source: Flickr




Article source: http://www.news.com.au/travel/travel-ideas/why-oman-is-the-destination-you-should-visit-now/story-fnjpj945-1227073670457

Written by enfoquec on September 29th, 2014

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Iran celebrates World Tourism Day in Tehran   no comments

Posted at 2:06 am in the places I would like to go

Iran’s Cultural Heritage, Tourism and Handicraft Organization has celebrated World Tourism Day during a ceremony held in Tehran, Press TV has reported.

Many Iranian tourism representatives and several government officials attended the gala held on September 27.

Some individuals and institutions were honored at the event for their outstanding contributions to Iran’s tourism industry.

According to International Civil Aviation Organization, Iran has the safest airspace in Middle East, and has been recently introduced as one of the 10 top tourist destinations because of its high climate variety and reasonable services.

Iran is also seeking to prepare its infrastructure for promoting Islamic and Halal tourism.

As Iran is planning to expand its tourism and attract the world’s people to the country with rich history and culture, the experts believe that a greater attention from responsible government sectors is required.

The Head of Iran’s Cultural Heritage, Handicrafts, and Tourism Organization (CHTHO) Masoud Soltanifar and Spanish Minister of Industry, Energy and Tourism José Manuel Soria López had earlier inked an agreement on the issue.

According to the agreement, “Spain will share its experience in hotel construction and converting historical buildings into guesthouses, and will also encourage Spanish shareholders to invest in Iran’s hotel industry.”

Iranian’s society is one of the most vibrant and diverse societies in the Middle East that is interesting for the lovers of history and ethnic variety.

Naqsh-e Jahan Square, Armenian monastic ensembles of Iran, Bam and its cultural landscape, Bisotoun, Pasargadae, Persepolis, Sheikh Safi al-din shrine, Shoushtar historical hydraulic system, Soltaniyeh, Tabriz historic bazaar complex, Takht-e Soleiman, Tchogha Zanbil and the Persian garden are among the Iranian historical heritage inscribed on UNESCO’s World Heritage List.

Many people around the globe annually celebrate World Tourism Day, registered on September 27.

The day aims to foster awareness among the international community of the importance of tourism and its social, cultural, political and economic values.

This year’s World Tourism Day (WTD) draws special attention to the role of tourism in contributing to one of the building blocks of a more sustainable future for all: Community development.

FGP/FGP

Article source: http://www.presstv.ir/detail/2014/09/28/380314/iran-marks-world-tourism-day/

Written by enfoquec on September 29th, 2014

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Filmmaker Portratys Bethlehem as Diverse Model for Middle East   no comments

Posted at 1:48 am in the places I would like to go

Christians and Muslims Live in Peace in Jesus Hometown

By Reuters

When Palestinian filmmaker Leila Sansour returned to Bethlehem to make a film about her home town, she had no idea she would end up running a campaign to put the ancient city on the world map as a model for diversity in the Middle East.

Sansour left Bethlehem as a teenager in 1983, disdainful of its size and determined never to return, but retraced her footsteps in 2004 to make a film about the city as a tribute to her late father, Anton Sansour, founder of Bethlehem University.

Returning to the city that gave birth to Christianity and is on the occupied West Bank, she found herself drawn into a campaign opposing Israel’s construction of an eight-meter (26 ft) high barrier weaving through the West Bank and Bethlehem.

Israel began building the wall in 2002 after a wave of Palestinian suicide bombings, citing security. Palestinians see the wall as a symbol of Israeli oppression that deprives them of land where they want to establish an independent state.

Sansour spent four years building a campaign called Open Bethlehem to promote the heritage of the city and to push for the wall to come down. But funding dried up so instead she decided to return to what she knew best – film making.

The result, that took several years in the making, is a 90-minute documentary, “Open Bethlehem,” drawing from 700 hours of original and archival footage telling Sansour’s story about her fight for Bethlehem.

Releasing the film this week, Sansour said the time was right to put the world spotlight back on Bethlehem, a city proud of its diversity, and urged people to visit her home town and to apply for a symbolic Bethlehem passport set up by her campaign.

“We want to use Bethlehem to highlight the damage that is being caused in the whole Middle East region, we want people to see it with their own eyes,” Sansour told the Thomson Reuters Foundation on Friday.

“We are hoping the film will be a powerful tool to revive our campaign and raise awareness about what is happening there and how it is possible to have a multi-faith, diverse city.”

Bethlehem, with a population of about 25,000 and a massive tourist industry, has a Muslim majority but is also home to one of the largest Palestinian Christian communities.

Sansour, who was raised a Christian, said the Open Bethlehem campaign was about preserving Bethlehem’s heritage and ensuring it stays an open, multi-faith city in the Middle East.

Around 50,000 Palestinian Christians, including 17,000 Catholics, live among four million Muslims in the Israeli-occupied West Bank and in Gaza.

They say Israel’s checkpoints and separation barrier cut them off from their neighbors and holy places in Jerusalem.

Sansour said she hoped her film and campaign would raise awareness of the situation aided by the symbolic Bethlehem passport that grants citizenship to the world’s best known “little town” – as sung in the popular Christmas carol – that stands for “joy and goodwill to all.”

“We can build two countries there that are happy and prosperous or we can continue having an open-ended conflict until the end of time,” she said.

The film “Open Bethlehem” and campaign will be launched in Britain during Christmas 2014 and in the United States during Christmas 2015.




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Article source: http://forward.com/articles/206413/filmmaker-portratys-bethlehem-as-diverse-model-for/

Written by enfoquec on September 27th, 2014

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Filmmaker stars Bethlehem as model of diversity in Middle East   no comments

Posted at 1:48 am in the places I would like to go


LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – When Palestinian filmmaker Leila Sansour returned to Bethlehem to make a film about her home town, she had no idea she would end up running a campaign to put the ancient city on the world map as a model for diversity in the Middle East.

Sansour left Bethlehem as a teenager in 1983, disdainful of its size and determined never to return, but retraced her footsteps in 2004 to make a film about the city as a tribute to her late father, Anton Sansour, founder of Bethlehem University.

Returning to the city that gave birth to Christianity and is on the occupied West Bank, she found herself drawn into a campaign opposing Israel’s construction of an eight-meter (26 ft) high barrier weaving through the West Bank and Bethlehem.

Israel began building the wall in 2002 after a wave of Palestinian suicide bombings, citing security. Palestinians see the wall as a symbol of Israeli oppression that deprives them of land where they want to establish an independent state.

Sansour spent four years building a campaign called Open Bethlehem to promote the heritage of the city and to push for the wall to come down. But funding dried up so instead she decided to return to what she knew best – film making.

The result, that took several years in the making, is a 90-minute documentary, “Open Bethlehem”, drawing from 700 hours of original and archival footage telling Sansour’s story about her fight for Bethlehem.

Releasing the film this week, Sansour said the time was right to put the world spotlight back on Bethlehem, a city proud of its diversity, and urged people to visit her home town and to apply for a symbolic Bethlehem passport set up by her campaign.

“We want to use Bethlehem to highlight the damage that is being caused in the whole Middle East region, we want people to see it with their own eyes,” Sansour told the Thomson Reuters Foundation on Friday.

“We are hoping the film will be a powerful tool to revive our campaign and raise awareness about what is happening there and how it is possible to have a multi-faith, diverse city.”

Bethlehem, with a population of about 25,000 and a massive tourist industry, has a Muslim majority but is also home to one of the largest Palestinian Christian communities.

Sansour, who was raised a Christian, said the Open Bethlehem campaign was about preserving Bethlehem’s heritage and ensuring it stays an open, multi-faith city in the Middle East.

Around 50,000 Palestinian Christians, including 17,000 Catholics, live among four million Muslims in the Israeli-occupied West Bank and in Gaza.

They say Israel’s checkpoints and separation barrier cut them off from their neighbors and holy places in Jerusalem.

Sansour said she hoped her film and campaign would raise awareness of the situation aided by the symbolic Bethlehem passport that grants citizenship to the world’s best known “little town” – as sung in the popular Christmas carol – that stands for “joy and goodwill to all”.

“We can build two countries there that are happy and prosperous or we can continue having an open-ended conflict until the end of time,” she said.

The film “Open Bethlehem” and campaign will be launched in Britain during Christmas 2014 and in the United States during Christmas 2015.

(Editing by Ros Russell)

Article source: http://in.reuters.com/article/2014/09/26/us-foundation-film-bethlehem-idINKCN0HL12720140926

Written by enfoquec on September 27th, 2014

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Statesmanship needed over the crisis in the Middle East   no comments

Posted at 1:48 am in the places I would like to go

As I hear the sabres rattling, I continue to think it utter madness for the UK to meddle again in the Middle East (Britain’s involvement in the new Iraq war is a doomed and dangerous gesture, 26 Septermber). War mongering does not win votes in the long term. As in Iraq, where it was always against the wishes of the majority of our country, this would be a complete disaster. Sadly and ironically, we would not be in this situation if Saddam was still in power – the lesser of two evils? Do they not realise that ISIS are encouraging us to respond to the beheadings in order to escalate further?

Rightly or wrongly, many Americans come across as trigger-happy, maybe to preserve their new oil interest in Iraq. This increases hatred for the US. As we have recently seen in Gaza, indiscriminate bombing does not solve underlying problems.

The key has always been, and must remain with, the local Muslim countries which are all desperately worried about the Isis regime and what its barbaric philosophy could mean to them as it spreads into their countries. Why not scale up reporting on this and encourage them? If the US wants to help sensibly it should use its massive influence and negotiating skills to encourage these countries to work together in a more high-profile way. It must also find a way of including Iran, which is a key player in this. It should support these countries, not lead them.

We desperately need some statesmanship – doing what is right for the future and not what seems popular right now – which has been conspicuously lacking over recent decades. I am not alone in thinking that the mould needs to be broken on Middle East thinking. Let it be us that do it while we still have credibility and respect. We have a massive multicultural heritage to draw on.
David Reynolds
London

• So Cameron has his Falklands moment at last. With only months to the election, and with no domestic policy to speak of, apart from shrinking the state back to 1948 levels and matching Ukip on immigration, he is forced to resort to war. Yet again, as Simon Jenkins says, Britain will demonstrate “our incompetence in trying to recast” the politics of the Middle East. Is Miliband so frightened of the rightwing media he cannot offer the obvious anti-war argument? Hasn’t history given us enough examples of the disastrous effects of US and UK interference? Anyway, since when has the indiscriminate blowing up of bodies been less medieval and barbaric than beheading?
Bernie Evans
Liverpool

• Why do we feel the need to get involved and still have the capacity to interfere in a war some 2,000 miles from home? This capacity not only includes a substantial airforce, but also sovereign bases on a sizeable chunk of Cyprus. This is not our fight. Yes, three UK citizens have been kidnapped, with one executed. We should look at all reasonable options for their release, but it must be acknowledged that they all chose to go to such a volatile area.

We are one of the richest nations on earth and still a leading advocate for liberal democracy and basic human rights. However, back home, there is still glaring underinvestment in our NHS, welfare and housing. The argument that we cannot afford to spend more on these is so glaringly exposed by the simple riposte of our military prowess to interfere on other continents.
Dave Packham
London

• No talk of the deficit when money is endlessly available for killing in wars. It was ever thus.
Keith Richards
London

• Only a short week after a vote on Scottish independence during which one of the points made by the yes campaign was that we didn’t feel the need to be constantly bolstering England’s self-aggrandisement of foreign adventures, here we are again, off to war. Did I dream the whole thing?
Allan McRobert
Kirkcaldy

• Prime ministers have regularly used war abroad to distract from constitutional matters or problems at home, as history shows. But that couldn’t happen today, could it?
Elizabeth Webster
Carnoustie, Angus

• A quick rummage through my memory suggests that Jim Callaghan was the last British prime minister not have started a war. Several successors had more than one each. I doubt that Bullingdon Boy David will fare any better than the others.
David Hardy
London

• The effect of of attempting to destroy Isis by annihilating its adherents is likely to be the same as that of the opponents of the early Christian church throwing believers to the lions. Every martyr generates double the number of new believers. When will we ever learn?
Mike Garnier
Bristol

Article source: http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/sep/26/statesmanship-needed-crisis-middle-east

Written by enfoquec on September 27th, 2014

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9.24.14: War, Disease, Low-Cost Banking   no comments

Posted at 1:35 am in the places I would like to go

TODAY AND TOMORROW IN BUSINESS
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Cancer of Extremism

President Barack Obama implored the world’s leaders to join him in fighting international crises ranging from the militant jihadists of the Islamic State to the Ebola epidemic in West Africa to Russia’s moves on Ukraine. In his annual United Nations speech, Obama cited the “cancer of violent extremism” in the Mideast as the issue that could set back global progress.

ZMapp’s Delayed Birth

The U.S. government hasn’t done a good job taking the idea behind ZMapp — the experimental cocktail of Ebola-fighting antibodies — and turning it into a treatment. The technology has been around for decades and, given the public-health emergency, the U.S. government could have moved it along faster, Brendan Greeley and Caroline Chen report in Bloomberg Businessweek. The treatment sat dormant for two years after coming into the hands of a little-known Pentagon agency in 2010.

Banking the Unbanked

Wal-Mart Stores Inc.’s deal with Green Dot Corp., known for its preloaded payment cards, is just the latest effort to supply checking accounts to the unbanked. Wal-Mart hopes to reach an estimated 10 million unbanked U.S. households, and hundreds of millions more households outside the U.S. have no access to traditional banks. The new service, to be called GoBank, will have no fees for overdrafts or bounced checks and no minimum account balance. The cost will be $8.95 a month if the customer makes direct deposits. Wal-Mart tried to obtain a federal bank charter in 2007 but dropped the effort once the banking industry lobbied heavily against it. An FT report reviews the many ways the banks are threatened by technology companies such as Apple Inc. and Facebook Inc.

Bent Out of Shape

A small but growing number of iPhone 6 owners say their phones have become warped from carrying the devices in their pockets. As iPhones get thinner and larger, pressure points from sitting or bending might cause the longer iPhone to flex in a way that damages the device. Adding to the snafus, Apple Inc. pulled an update to its iOS 8 operating software after scores of customers experienced dropped cellular service or couldn’t use the fingerprint reading feature. Other customers reported that iOS 8 was causing apps by Facebook Inc. and others to crash.

Back to Square One

“I would challenge you guys to bend our Passport,” a cheeky John Chen, BlackBerry Ltd.’s chief executive officer, said in introducing his company’s new smartphone. The Passport screen is a perfectly square 4.5 inches (like an actual passport). The phone, aimed at business users who prefer BlackBerry’s qwerty physical keyboard and want to review spreadsheets more than watch videos, retails for $599 (about $250 with a two-year carrier contract). One problem: It doesn’t fit into a car’s cup holder or the phone pocket in most purses. And if it doesn’t catch on, the Passport could be BlackBerry’s last gasp as a handset maker. It has been one-upped by Apple’s iPhones and the Android models of Samsung Electronics. Samsung hopes to steal a march on Apple by putting its new Galaxy Note 4 on sale in China next week, ahead of the iPhone 6.

Amazon Antitrust

Hundreds of authors, including bestsellers Stephen King, Donna Tartt and Malcolm Gladwell, will ask the U.S. Justice Department to open an antitrust inquiry into Amazon.com Inc.’s business practices, especially its dispute with Hachette over e-book prices.

Russian Debt Sale

After cancelling nine sovereign-debt auctions, Russia completed the sale of $261 million (10 billion rubles) in 10-year bonds. The sale resulted in an average yield of 9.37 percent. It was the first Russian debt sale since the U.S. and European Union slapped sanctions on the country.

Homebuilder Happiness

New home sales had been a disappointment most of this year, yet homebuilders’ confidence remained high. Today we found out why: New home sales surged 18 percent to an annualized 504,000 in August, far more than the projected 4.4 percent increase, and the highest level in more than six years. Housing’s recovery has come in fits and starts all year, so it will take several more months of data to know if the improvement is real.

Climate-Change-Onomics

The cost of curbing carbon emissions may be considerably cheaper than earlier estimates suggested and may even enhance growth, writes the NYT’s Eduardo Porter. He cites data from an international commission appointed by a handful of rich and poor countries to take a fresh look at the economics of climate change.

Changing of the Guard

China’s reform-minded central banker, Zhou Xiaochuan, has been the face of China’s economy to global markets for 11 years but may be swept out of office soon, the WSJ reports. Chinese leader Xi Jinping is considering replacing Zhou as part of a wider personnel reshuffle that also comes amid battles over how far to take economic reforms. The top contender to succeed Zhou is Guo Shuqing, a former banker and securities regulator who is currently governor of Shandong, a prosperous eastern province.

Pimco Probed

The Securities and Exchange Commission is investigating bond-trading powerhouse Pacific Investment Management Co. for possible fraudulent pricing of an exchange-traded fund. The issue is whether Pimco bought thinly traded securities at discounted prices, then valued the same securities at higher prices when setting the fund’s daily value. The probe is another headache for Pimco, having just gone through a management upheaval and a cash drain. It could also dent the popularity of ETFs more broadly. They mimic an index, like a mutual fund, yet trade on an exchange, like a stock. Yet the actively managed variety (like the Pimco fund) aren’t as simple, transparent or low cost as the passive kind and may have moved too far afield to be useful to retail investors, the FT reports.

Greenberg’s Revenge

Maurice Greenberg, the wily former chief executive officer of American International Group, is seeking more than $40 billion from the U.S. in a lawsuit that is set to go to trial in Washington next week. Greenberg claims that the U.S. cheated him and other AIG shareholders when it rescued the insurer in 2008. The NYT reports that he is covering some of his legal costs by raising millions from Wall Street friends and investors, who will get a cut of any damages awarded should Greenberg win.

Yale Beats Harvard

Yale University, with one of the most closely watched education endowments, said its fund had earned a 20.2 percent return for the fiscal year, bringing its value to $23.9 billion. Harvard University’s gain for the year ended June 30 was 15.4 percent but its value is higher than Yale’s (and the largest in higher education) at $36.4 billion.

Hillary’s Agenda

In a possible preview of a 2016 presidential campaign agenda, Hillary Clinton called for more company-paid family leave and child care at the Clinton Global Initiative. She and daughter Chelsea Clinton also unveiled a $600 million effort, with the Brookings Institution, to help disadvantaged girls in Sub-Saharan Africa and Southwest Asia attend secondary school.

And Don’t Forget

  • U.S. President Barack Obama will deliver remarks at a UN meeting on the Ebola epidemic.
  • Congressional Black Caucus Foundation holds a national town hall meeting in Washington on voting rights, the midterm elections and the state of black America.
  • The Information Technology and Innovation Foundation holds a briefing on Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s Sept. 29-30 visit to Washington.
  • Brookings examines whether the Internet is fracturing and other challenges facing cross-border data flows in the digital economy.
  • Heritage Foundation previews the 2014 term of the U.S. Supreme Court.
  • On the economic data front, we will get orders for U.S. durable goods in August (they probably slumped); weekly natural gas supply report from the U.S. Energy Information Administration; and U.S. initial jobless claims.
  • European central bankers attend a conference on the euro’s future in Vilnius, Lithuania.
  • German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier holds a press conference as chairman of the Group of Seven after a meeting with its foreign ministers and Middle Eastern counterparts in New York.
  • Nike Inc. and Hennes Mauritz AB announce earnings.

Top This

A triplex penthouse at Zeckendorf Development Co.’s tower under construction on Manhattan’s Upper East Side will be offered for sale at $130 million, making it New York’s most expensive apartment listing. The record for Manhattan’s most expensive completed residential deal is held by former Citigroup Inc. Chairman Sanford Weill, who sold his Central Park West penthouse or $88 million in 2012.

To contact the writer of this article: Paula Dwyer at pdwyer11@bloomberg.net.

To contact the editor responsible for this article: James Greiff at jgreiff@bloomberg.net.

Article source: http://www.bloombergview.com/articles/2014-09-24/9-24-14-war-disease-low-cost-banking

Written by enfoquec on September 25th, 2014

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