The UAE: A Thriving Japanese Car Market   no comments

Posted at 9:33 am in the places I would like to go

The Japanese automotive industry is one of the most prominent in the world.


Japan is currently the world’s third largest automobile manufacturer in the world with an annual production of 9.9 million vehicles in 2012. Six out of ten of the world’s largest automobile manufacturers have their bases in the island nation.

Brands like Toyota, Honda, Nissan, Suzuki, Mitsubishi and Mazda are synonymous with safety and quality. Likewise,Yamaha and Kawasaki remain the bywords of durability and endurance. The ‘green’ car industry is also ruled by Japanese car–makers Toyota (which includes the highly acclaimed Prius) and Honda (includes the Civic and Insight hybrids). Nissan is also aggressively pursuing a plan to push green car sales.

Japanese car–makers have faced a string of tough challenges over the past few years: starting with the 2008 financial crisis, followed by the yen strengthening to a record high against the dollar – a move that undermines the price competitiveness of vehicles built in Japan and is threatening companies to move production overseas.

A massive earthquake and tsunami in Japan and severe floods in Thailand disrupted the parts supply chain and led to months of production stoppages and constrained the supply of vehicles followed by recalls of millions of vehicles due to safety glitches.

In spite of these setbacks, Japan’s auto industry is starting to see potential big improvements in its business environment.

The yen recently weakened to a 28-month low against the dollar as the newly established government vowed to tackle the yen’s strength. The Nikkei subindex for the auto sector has surged more than 26 per cent since mid –November, outstripping a 20 percent rise on the benchmark Nikkei during the same period.

UAE’S TOP TRADING PARTNER

According to a report by Dubai Customs, Japan is the UAE’s top automobile trading partner, accounting for 25 per cent of foreign trade valued at Dh 8 billion for the first half of 2013.

Japanese brands traditionally regarded as more reliable than their European and US counterparts–are the country’s best one sellers.

Car giant Toyota announced a strong growth of 31 per cent in sales across the Middle East in 2012.The Japanese auto giant delivered 660,285 vehicles, making 2012 a record year in the region for the Toyota and Lexus brands. Globally, sales of Toyota and Lexus cars totalled 8.72 million units, an increase of 23 per cent compared to 2011.

Across the GCC region alone, Toyota sold 624,400 vehicles in 2012.

Similarly, 2012 was acknowledged as the best year ever for sales for Nissan Middle East for its Nissan Patrol flagship vehicle.

More than 14,000 Nissan Patrols were sold in the Middle East in 2012 representing a 66 per cent increase in sales and giving Nissan Patrol a record market share of 22 per cent in the Gulf market.

The Nissan Patrol is Nissan’s flagship SUV model and enjoys a rich heritage and passionate following in the Middle East that dates back to the 1950s. The iconic vehicle notched another historic milestone by setting a Guinness World Record – ‘heaviest object pulled by any production vehicle’.

An unmodified production of Nissan Patrol hauled a 170.9-tonne cargo plane, inclusive of the weight of the plane, cargo and fuel, for over 50 meters at the Sharjah International Airport.

GROWTH IN AUTO PARTS TRADE

The auto parts trade in the Dubai has grown over 27 per cent in the last four years, according to a Dubai Customs report.

Dubai’s auto spare parts foreign trade was valued at Dhs7 billion in 2012, an increase of Dhs8 billion as compared to Dhs29 billion in 2009. The auto spare parts market continued to rise, reaching Dhs32 billion in 2010 and Dhs36 billion in 2011, most of which is made up from export and re-export activities, taking up the major share of foreign trade.

Japan is deemed to be Dubai`s top trade partner in spare parts and accessories, claiming 28 per cent of the imports market share with a value of Dhs6.1 billion.


Article source: http://gulfbusiness.com/2014/04/uae-thriving-japanese-car-market/

Written by enfoquec on April 6th, 2014

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5 free things in Tel Aviv, from beaches to boulevards to strolls in the park   no comments

Posted at 8:53 am in the places I would like to go

TEL AVIV, Israel — As a city regularly ranked the most expensive in the Middle East, you are going to have a hard time enjoying Tel Aviv’s plethora of hopping clubs, swanky bars and mouthwatering restaurants without making a major dent in your wallet. But if you are ready to pack a lunch, use your legs and lose yourself in the seaside city’s urban vibe, you’ll find there is still plenty to take in without shelling out a shekel.

THE BEACHES

A dozen municipal beaches stretch out along 14 kilometers (9 miles) of coast, offering ample space for relaxing in the soft sand and dipping in the warm Mediterranean waters. Access is free of charge and some offer extra amenities such as beach volleyball courts and outdoor exercise equipment. You can also observe and partake in Israel’s unofficial national sport of matkot, or beach paddleball. The pros come out to the Hilton Beach early Saturday mornings, where the fast-paced sound of balls smacking echoes along the promenade. Later, tourists are also welcome to join public sessions of Israeli folk dancing.

THE BOULEVARDS

Tel Aviv’s founders envisioned a “garden city” in which small roads lead into green enclaves nestled inside a bustling urban landscape. Visitors get a sense of this unique design thanks to the wide tree-lined walkways and bike paths that split the six boulevards of the city (Rothschild, Chen, Nordau, Ben-Gurion, Ben-Zion and Yerushalayim).

Along trendy Rothschild, you’ll get a glimpse of “The White City” — a collection of some 4,000 boxy, Bauhaus-style buildings that earned Tel Aviv UNESCO recognition as a World Heritage Site. On Ben-Gurion, the home of the boulevard’s namesake (and Israel’s first prime minister, David Ben-Gurion) can be toured free of charge. As the epicenter of a social protest movement that swept the country against its high cost of living, Tel Aviv has seen street kiosks pop up in recent years that offer discounted coffee during the day and “drink points” at night with affordable alcohol that can (legally) be consumed openly on the streets of Tel Aviv.

THE YARKON PARK

Tel Aviv’s primary open space sits along the Yarkon River and offers a perfect place for a jog, a stroll or a picnic. Renting kayaks will cost money, but you can lazily lounge along the riverbank as long as you want or visit a free mini-petting zoo. Those in the mood for more adventure can try scaling the outdoor climbing walls or join a pickup soccer or basketball game.

JAFFA

The biblical Mediterranean port city of Jaffa is part of the joint Tel Aviv-Jaffa municipality. It offers a gateway into the city’s origins, with synagogues, churches, mosques and clock towers from the Ottoman era open to visitors. In Old Jaffa, walk down the ancient cobblestone alleyways, pop into pottery stores or just grab a seat to stare at the glistening waters below. A renovated port area with myriad restaurants and coffee shops offers a pleasant place to walk by the sea, where rickety fishermen’s ships still dock. Cool off from the blazing heat at the port’s new indoor market. Now quite gentrified, there are also chic neighborhoods, galleries and a bohemian flea market to explore.

NEVE TZEDEK

Long before Tel Aviv became a city in 1909, the first Jewish neighborhood to emerge from Jaffa was Neve Tzedek. Hebrew for Oasis of Justice, today it is literally a Soho-like enclave, lined with upscale designer stores and shops and galleries, but it also maintains its original feel of a quaint village. Explore the main Shabazi Street, but also the smaller passageways that house boutiques and trendy coffee shops. The neighborhood’s flagship Suzanne Dellal Center offers pricey dance performances, but only a short walk away you can find the renovated Hatachana, Tel Aviv’s old railway station where live music can be enjoyed while observing outdoor art exhibits.

Article source: http://www.therepublic.com/w/ML--Travel-Trip-5-Free-Things-Tel-Aviv

Written by enfoquec on April 4th, 2014

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5 free things in Tel Aviv, from beaches to boulevards to strolls in the park   no comments

Posted at 8:53 am in the places I would like to go

TEL AVIV, Israel — As a city regularly ranked the most expensive in the Middle East, you are going to have a hard time enjoying Tel Aviv’s plethora of hopping clubs, swanky bars and mouthwatering restaurants without making a major dent in your wallet. But if you are ready to pack a lunch, use your legs and lose yourself in the seaside city’s urban vibe, you’ll find there is still plenty to take in without shelling out a shekel.

THE BEACHES

A dozen municipal beaches stretch out along 14 kilometers (9 miles) of coast, offering ample space for relaxing in the soft sand and dipping in the warm Mediterranean waters. Access is free of charge and some offer extra amenities such as beach volleyball courts and outdoor exercise equipment. You can also observe and partake in Israel’s unofficial national sport of matkot, or beach paddleball. The pros come out to the Hilton Beach early Saturday mornings, where the fast-paced sound of balls smacking echoes along the promenade. Later, tourists are also welcome to join public sessions of Israeli folk dancing.

THE BOULEVARDS

Tel Aviv’s founders envisioned a “garden city” in which small roads lead into green enclaves nestled inside a bustling urban landscape. Visitors get a sense of this unique design thanks to the wide tree-lined walkways and bike paths that split the six boulevards of the city (Rothschild, Chen, Nordau, Ben-Gurion, Ben-Zion and Yerushalayim).

Along trendy Rothschild, you’ll get a glimpse of “The White City” — a collection of some 4,000 boxy, Bauhaus-style buildings that earned Tel Aviv UNESCO recognition as a World Heritage Site. On Ben-Gurion, the home of the boulevard’s namesake (and Israel’s first prime minister, David Ben-Gurion) can be toured free of charge. As the epicenter of a social protest movement that swept the country against its high cost of living, Tel Aviv has seen street kiosks pop up in recent years that offer discounted coffee during the day and “drink points” at night with affordable alcohol that can (legally) be consumed openly on the streets of Tel Aviv.

THE YARKON PARK

Tel Aviv’s primary open space sits along the Yarkon River and offers a perfect place for a jog, a stroll or a picnic. Renting kayaks will cost money, but you can lazily lounge along the riverbank as long as you want or visit a free mini-petting zoo. Those in the mood for more adventure can try scaling the outdoor climbing walls or join a pickup soccer or basketball game.

JAFFA

The biblical Mediterranean port city of Jaffa is part of the joint Tel Aviv-Jaffa municipality. It offers a gateway into the city’s origins, with synagogues, churches, mosques and clock towers from the Ottoman era open to visitors. In Old Jaffa, walk down the ancient cobblestone alleyways, pop into pottery stores or just grab a seat to stare at the glistening waters below. A renovated port area with myriad restaurants and coffee shops offers a pleasant place to walk by the sea, where rickety fishermen’s ships still dock. Cool off from the blazing heat at the port’s new indoor market. Now quite gentrified, there are also chic neighborhoods, galleries and a bohemian flea market to explore.

NEVE TZEDEK

Long before Tel Aviv became a city in 1909, the first Jewish neighborhood to emerge from Jaffa was Neve Tzedek. Hebrew for Oasis of Justice, today it is literally a Soho-like enclave, lined with upscale designer stores and shops and galleries, but it also maintains its original feel of a quaint village. Explore the main Shabazi Street, but also the smaller passageways that house boutiques and trendy coffee shops. The neighborhood’s flagship Suzanne Dellal Center offers pricey dance performances, but only a short walk away you can find the renovated Hatachana, Tel Aviv’s old railway station where live music can be enjoyed while observing outdoor art exhibits.

Article source: http://www.therepublic.com/w/ML--Travel-Trip-5-Free-Things-Tel-Aviv

Written by enfoquec on April 4th, 2014

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County Durham exhibition shows off the Art of Egyptian Tentmakers   no comments

Posted at 8:29 am in the places I would like to go

An exhibition celebrating the art of Egyptian tentmaking enjoys its last day in Durham today.

Weekend visitors to Durham Castle’s Norman Chapel have been treated to displays of exquisite textiles as well as demonstrations of the ancient craft tradition and associated lectures as part of The Art of Egyptian Tentmakers.

Contemporary appliquéd pieces of design, craftsmanship and colour were commissioned for this exhibit in the 900-year-old chapel. In a variety of sizes, the pieces, serve as wall hangings, bedspreads, and pillow coverings. They are not woven, as are European tapestries, but stitched with impressive dexterity.

For centuries Cairo’s master craftsmen have recorded their rich cultural heritage in this way.

Originally intended to line tents, the pieces have subsequently been used in an array of contexts from weddings and pilgrimage celebrations to political rallies. Craftsman Hany Abdel Kader, who is one of many keeping this ancient tradition alive has been on hand throughout to demonstrate the complex techniques employed in the creation of the beautiful pieces. As well as being able to look at the displays and see the craftsmanship for themselves, visitors have been invited to buy contemporary examples of the Egyptian textiles.

Exhibition of the work from Tentmakers of Islamic Cairo, Prof James Piscatori, Middle East Studies at Durham University

 

The exhibition made up part of a wider season dedicated to exploring and celebrating the cultural traditions of the Arab World built on years of study of the Middle East in Durham. Organised by the Durham World Heritage Site, in conjunction with Durham University’s School of Government and International Affairs, the season also included a photographic exhibition featuring the Tentmakers of Islamic Cario.

Meanwhile James Piscatori, professor at Durham’s School of Government and International Affairs, and Seif El Rashidi, the co-ordinator of the Durham World Heritage Site, also presented two short and informal talks on the history of Islamic Textiles yesterday.

Challenging the pervasive image of the Middle East as volatile and troubled, it was intended that displaying these lavish pieces while exploring the heritage behind them should serve as a reminder of the region’s ancient, intricate and aesthetically rich cultural traditions.

James Piscatori, project leader says, “This is a fantastic opportunity to discover the rich visual culture of the Middle East, and to meet with a master craftsman representing a highly specialised skill that has existed on one street in Cairo for at least a thousand years.

“It is a tradition that resonates very well with the quilting tradition of the North East.”

The Art of Egyptian Tentmakers in Durham Castle’s Norman Chapel will be open from 10am to 6pm today.

Article source: http://www.thejournal.co.uk/culture/arts-culture-news/county-durham-exhibition-shows-art-6896172

Written by enfoquec on April 2nd, 2014

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‘The Voice Arabia’ Crowns Iraqi Singer Sattar Saad   no comments

Posted at 7:38 am in the places I would like to go

BEIRUT — Iraqi singer Sattar Saad was crowned winner of the “The Voice Arabia” on Saturday during an intense finale which drew millions of viewers across the Middle East and saw guest star Ricky Martin take the stage to perform his new songs “Adrenalina” and “Come With Me.”

Aired by satcaster Middle East Broadcasting Corporation (MBC), The Arab version of “The Voice” wrapped with Saad draped in an Iraqi flag on stage receiving the trophy from his coach, Iraqi pop music sensation Kadim Al Sahir.

Saad’s victory, which sparked celebrations in the streets of Baghdad, earned him a record contract with Universal Music Group.

The second season of “The Voice” in the MENA region saw escalating ratings, driven by young auds “which was reflected by the voting and the social media platforms in the Arab world,” said MBC spokesman Mazen Hayek.

Martin, who arrived by private jet to Beirut where he made an overnight stop, offered the winner some advice before exiting the stage amid an audience frenzy and vowing to back in the Arab world “very soon.”

“My advice to the artist who wins tonight is: keep your focus, be surrounded by good people, and fight to bring your music to the rest of the world,” he said.

Young Iraqi singers featured prominently on “The Voice Arabia” this year. Two out of four finalists were from the country which has a rich musical heritage, a revival of which could help it rise from the ashes of war.

“It’s something that gives them more hope,” said the show’s host, Egyptian actor Mohamed Karim.

But Karim pointed out that several countries across the Arab world, from which the show’s 100 participants were selected, are enduring very rough living conditions. One of the finalists was from civil war-torn Syria.

Karim also underlined the pan-Arab nature of the show.

“The good thing about ‘The Voice” in this region is you’ve got more than twenty Arabic countries involved. All these countries speaking the same language, it’s kind of hard to find that anywhere else around the world,” he noted.

Though the Middle East does not have an exact TV ratings metric system, Karim said the finale’s audience is estimated to have scored 100 million viewers.

 

Article source: http://variety.com/2014/tv/news/1201150095-1201150095/

Written by enfoquec on March 31st, 2014

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Fire destroys heritage buildings   no comments

Posted at 6:11 am in the places I would like to go

A huge fire gutted an old five-story building in Jeddah’s historic area on Tuesday, and damaged several others.
No one was injured and the Civil Defense put the blaze out.
Waleed Abu Shanab from the Civil Defense told Arab News that 15 teams battled the fire, supported by the Red Crescent, security and traffic officials, and several volunteers who evacuated residents living in the area.
“The fire started in an old building and spread to other neighboring buildings. The fire caused the main building to collapse and damaged several others.”
Abu Shanab said the dilapidated building was inhabited by illegals.
The area has seen several historic buildings destroyed over the past few years. The area has unique architecture, only seen along the Mediterranean and in the Arabian Peninsula.
Similar structures in the cities of Suez and Al-Qasseer in Egypt and Sawakin in Sudan, have disappeared.
The area has lost 200 historic buildings since it was adopted area as a national heritage site in 1980.
Experts believe only 375 buildings now remain of about 1,000 that existed 25 years ago. Jeddah Municipality has implemented a special project to combat fires in the area.
The Unesco recently rejected the Kingdom’s request for its inclusion as a World Heritage Site, because the authorities have allegedly not taken action to preserve or create awareness about it.

Article source: http://www.arabnews.com/news/546031

Written by enfoquec on March 27th, 2014

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Greece: Wonderful family destination   no comments

Posted at 5:24 am in the places I would like to go

If you have already visited Greece for your summer holidays, then you are fully aware of how your children can really have the time of their lives here.
But if this is your first visit, read a list we’ve made for you and choose your favorite family destination.
Either way, mums and dads, be prepared to relax and have a good time.
“Paidiá, kalosírthate!” (Children, welcome!) is what you and your children will hear when you come to Greece. Your family holidays begin with a hearty, warm welcome in a country where children can enjoy memorable adventures in the past and present. Here they will find themselves in places where their favorite heroes lived, like, Hercules, Alexander the Great, and the 300. They can learn about Troy and run around the track at the birthplace of the Olympics.
But, let’s see what else your children –and you, of course– will love in Greece:
• Sunny sandy beaches with crystal-clear waters and azure seas filling rocky coves and caves
• Classic ruins in romantic settings
• Olive, orange and lemon groves and important nature reserves
• delicious kid-friendly food cooked with the most nutritional ingredients of the Mediterranean diet: virgin olive oil, fresh fish, fruit and vegetables, etc.
• Water parks, beaches and spectacular swimming pools open all day long, and
• Above all, safety and warm hospitality.

Here are just a few Greek destinations to help you get an idea of how you and your family could spend your summer vacations in Greece.

Corfu (Kérkyra)
Where: In the Ionian Sea, part of the Ionian group.
Why: Often called the “Garden Isle”, Corfu is full of olive groves, cypresses, bushes, colorful anemones, orchids and a number of endemic flowers. Even the long sandy beaches provide a good example of marine flora. During the summer, electric blue thistles, sea squill (of the lily family) and flowering shrubs bloom. Corfu indulges in a mild Mediterranean climate all year round which is also good for the health.
Must visit: The beautifully preserved Old Town of Corfu, a UNESCO world heritage site, filled with Venetian, French and British monuments and remarkable works of architecture. The sites that used to be the old aristocracy’s favorites: Mon Repos and Achilleion Palaces, Paleópolis, etc.
Where to stay: Five and four-star hotels offer accommodation specially designed for families and daily activity programs to entertain children (such as competitions, animation programs, etc.). Family-run, beachfront guesthouses also offer all the comforts you and your family need.
Corfu was the favorite island of Empress of Austria Elisabeth of Bavaria, also known as Sisi. It was for her that Emperor Franz Joseph I built the Achilleion Palace.
Join in with: The International Corfu Festival dedicated to promoting the rich musical heritage of the island. Concerts are held in Duomo, Achilleion Palace, the Fortress, several museums and art cafés.
An extra tip for kids: Enjoy your favorite cartoon movies at the open-air summer cinemas in the city.

Halkidiki
Halkidiki isn’t actually an island. It’s a peninsula on the mainland jutting out into the sea. But with so many superb beaches, it feels like an island!!!
Where: a peninsula in northern Greece, part of Central Macedonia
Why: Halkidikí is home to countless superb beaches, almost all of them blue flag winners, lush green forests and a rich gastronomic and cultural heritage.
Must visit: The cave of Petrálona, one of the most important caves in Europe, Stágeira, the home land of Aristotle.
Where to stay: Rent a room in a traditional seafront guesthouse, or choose from a wide selection of major hotel complexes. There also hotels that offer specially organized activities for youngsters of all ages (from 4 months to16 years old), so that parents can enjoy spa treatments while their kids are being looked after by specialist child minders. Special prices depending on your child’s age are also on offer.
Join in with: Open-air festivals that feature world-class jazz, classical, ethnic and folk music.
An extra tip for kids: Enjoy pool games and water polo in pools specially designed for you!

Crete
Where: In the southern part of the Aegean Sea, separating the Aegean from the Mediterranean Sea
Why: Crete is home to Europe’s earliest civilization. Glorious sites, splendid beaches, remote hinterlands and hospitable people. By far the longest summer in Greece.
Must visit: The Archaeological Museum in Iráklion, the Minoan sites (Knossos, Mália, Phaestos, Zakros), Lassíthi Plateau, the Diktean Cave,Chania and Rethymno old towns, Samaria Gorge, the islet of Spinalonga.
Where to stay: At family-oriented resorts which operate as self-contained communities and offer everything from sportswear to boat trips and cultural tours. The sand and the beaches in these places are ideal for children who want to play and paddle all day long. There are also countless guesthouses and 3-star hotels all over the island; either on or within a short walk of the seafront or in the mountain villages.
Join in with: Countryside festivals (paniyíria) and other celebrations held in the cities, traditional Cretan weddings and Renaissance festivals.
An extra tip for kids: Definitely visit Cretaquarium in Heraklion (Iráklion) and the water park in Chania with Disneyland games and giant waterslides!

Zakynthos
Where: In the Ionian Sea, the southernmost of the seven main Ionian islands
Why: Lush vegetation, white-pebble Blue Flag winning beaches with azure waters, impressive Venetian works of architecture surrounded by olive and fruit groves, numerous family tavérnas with panoramic views over the sea.
Must visit: San Marco Square, the Kástro (Venetian fort), the Solomos Museum, the Blue Caves at Cape Skinári, To Naváyio (Shipwreck Bay) and the Cape Kerí caves. Where to stay: At well-organized resorts, in rooms, seafront hotels, rentable windmills (sorry, there are only two).
Join in with: Day-trips to tiny cliff-top hamlets to catch the sunset and countryside festivals (paniyíria).
An extra tip for kids: Learn how to protect the loggerhead sea turtle and explore the island’s fascinating underwater world at the Marine Park!

Alonissos
Where: In the Aegean Sea, the third member of the Northern Sporades
Why: Peaceful and serene, more rugged than its neighbors, with a strong British and Italian presence and second-home owners from all over the world, spring waters, pine forest, olive groves, orchards, arbutus (a native flowering plant), heather, kermes oak, and lentisc (type of mastic tree). Resident herbalists and a homeopathic academy. Some of Greece’s cleanest seas.
Must visit: Hóra (Paleá Alónnissos), Stení Vála, Roussoúm Yialós, Marpoúnda Bay.
Where to stay: There are a few all-inclusive hotels, many rooms and family guesthouses, plus some 3-star hotels.
Join in with: Art exhibits and countryside festivals (paniyíria).
An extra tip for kids: Find out how to adopt a newly-born monk seal at the Marine Park (and please eat some of the local apricots –they are really tasty here)!

Ancient Pella: In the land of Alexander the Great.

Where: In the current Pella regional unit of Central Macedonia in Greece
Why: Set out on a magical journey through time to the glorious kingdom of ancient Macedonia, where Alexander the Great was born. Peer into the rich history of the Macedonian state capital, a bustling metropolis of the Classical period. A number of excavations of the site reveal the ancient city’s majestic grandeur.
Must visit: The monumental palatial complex that occupies the northernmost hill of the city, and covers an area of 60.000 m2. Wander around the city’s commercial and manufacturing center, the so-called agora (ayorá), which was in fact the biggest agora of the ancient world.
This huge building complex included shops, workshops, administration offices, and the repository of the city’s historical records.
The main avenue of agora was actually connected with the city’s port, the ruins of which are still visible today.
The ancient agora is constructed according to the famous urban planning of Hippodamus (Hippodamian grid plan): well-defined city blocks, paved streets with sidewalks, and elaborate water supply and sewage systems. They all illustrate Pella’s modern infrastructure and sophisticated urban design. The two-story private houses built in Doric and Ionic style brings to mind images of a prosperous, ancient, city.

An extra tip for children: You will certainly be impressed by the outstanding mosaic floors that used to decorate the city’s grand mansions – the most famous are the ones depicting the Abduction of Helen, Rapture, the Amazonomachy (the battle of Amazons), and the Deer Hunt. You can marvel at these decorated floors (considered the most important group of mosaics in Macedonia) at the New Archaeological Museum of Pella.

Article source: http://www.arabnews.com/news/545356

Written by enfoquec on March 25th, 2014

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