Archive for the ‘the places I would like to go’ Category

Shark Bay   no comments

File:Shark Bay Phytoplankton in Bloom.jpg

in shark bay in Australia, I heard that I can find a lot of dolphins. in addition, it’s home town of various animals such as shark, birds and sea cow. I would like to visit there to see dolphins.

text and photo from wikipedia.

Shark Bay

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shark_Bay

Shark Bay is a World Heritage Site in the Gascoyne region of Western Australia. It is an area centred approximately on 25°30′S 113°30′E / 25.5°S 113.5°E / -25.5; 113.5Coordinates: 25°30′S 113°30′E / 25.5°S 113.5°E / -25.5; 113.5, 800 kilometres north of Perth, on the westernmost point of Australia. An expedition led by Dirk Hartog happened upon the area in 1616, becoming the second group of Europeans known to have visited Australia.[1] Shark Bay was named by William Dampier, in 1699.

The area has a population of fewer than 1,000 people and a coastline of over 1,500 kilometres. The half dozen small communities making up this population occupy less than 1% of the total area.

Written by enfoquec on February 12th, 2011

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Rwenzori Mountains National Park   no comments

File:Rwenzori mountains FP.jpg

my friend who loves adventure went this place. she told me that it was significant experience you can never experience if you live in urban city. that talk makes me feel I really want to visit this place. but, it is so far from the US….

Rwenzori Mountains National Park

photo and text from wikipedia.

Rwenzori Mountains National Park is a Ugandan national park and UNESCO World Heritage Site located in the Rwenzori Mountains. Almost 1,000 km2 (386 sq mi) in size, the park has Africa’s third highest mountain peak and many waterfalls, lakes, and glaciers. The park is known for its beautiful plant life.

Written by enfoquec on January 31st, 2011

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Carthage   no comments

photo and text from wikipedia

Carthage

Carthage (Latin: Carthago or Karthago, Ancient Greek: Καρχηδών Karkhēdōn, Arabic: قرطاج Qarṭāj‎, Berber: ⴽⴰⵔⵜⴰⵊⴻⵏ Kartajen, Hebrew: קרתגו‎ kartago, from the Phoenician Qart-ḥadašt קַרְתְּ חַדַשְתְּ meaning New City, implying it was a ‘new Tyre’) is a major urban centre that has existed for nearly 3,000 years on the Gulf of Tunis, developing from a Phoenician colony of the 1st millennium BC which has given place to the current suburb outside Tunis, Tunisia, with a population (2004 Census) of 20,715.

The first civilization that developed within the city’s sphere of influence is referred to as Punic (a form of the word “Phoenician”) or Carthaginian. The city of Carthage is located on the eastern side of Lake Tunis across from the centre of Tunis. According to Roman legend it was founded in 814 BC by Phoenician colonists from Tyre under the leadership of Elissa (Queen Dido). It became a large and rich city and thus a major power in the Mediterranean. The resulting rivalry with Syracuse and Rome was accompanied by several wars with respective invasions of each other’s homeland. Hannibal’s invasion of Italy in the Second Punic War culminated in the Carthaginian victory at Cannae and led to a serious threat to the continuation of Roman rule over Italy; however, Carthage emerged from the conflict at its historical weakest after Hannibal’s defeat at the Battle of Zama in 202 BC. After the Third Punic War, the city was destroyed by the Romans in 146 BC. However, the Romans refounded Carthage, which became the Empire’s third most important city and the capital of the short-lived Vandal kingdom. It remained one of the most important Roman cities until the Muslim conquest when it was destroyed a second time in 698 AD.

Written by enfoquec on January 12th, 2011

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Aldabra   no comments

photo and text from wikipedia

Aldabra

Aldabra, the world’s second largest coral atoll, is in the Aldabra Group of islands in the Indian Ocean that form part of the Seychelles. Uninhabited and extremely isolated, Aldabra is virtually untouched by humans, has distinctive island fauna including the Aldabra Giant Tortoise, and is designated a World Heritage Site.

Written by enfoquec on January 10th, 2011

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Sabratha   no comments

photo and text from wikipedia

Sabratha

Sabratha, Sabratah or Siburata (Arabic: صبراتة‎), in the Az Zawiyah District[1] in the northwestern corner of modern Libya, was the westernmost of the “three cities” of Tripolis. From 2001 to 2007 it was the capital of the former Sabratha Wa Surman District. It lies on the Mediterranean coast about 65km (40 miles) west of Tripoli (ancient Oea). The extant archaeological site was inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1982.

Written by enfoquec on January 9th, 2011

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Stone Town   no comments

photo and text from wikipedia

Stone Town

Stone Town also known as Mji Mkongwe (swahili for “old town”) is the old part of Zanzibar City, the main city of Zanzibar, in Tanzania, as opposed to Ng’ambo (Swahili for ‘the other side’). It is located on the western coast of Unguja, the main island of the Zanzibar Archipelago. Former capital of the Zanzibar Sultanate, and flourishing centre of the spice trade as well as the slave trade in the 19th century, it retained its importance as the main city of Zanzibar during colonial rule. When Tanganyika and Zanzibar joined each other to form the United Republic of Tanzania, Zanzibar kept a semi-autonomous status, with Stone Town as its local government seat.

Stone Town is a city of prominent historical and artistic importance in East Africa. Its architecture, mostly dating back to the 19th century, reflects the diverse influences underlying the Swahili culture, with a unique mixture of Moorish, Arab, Persian, Indian and European elements. For this reason, the town has been included in UNESCO’s World Heritage Sites in 2000.

Due to its heritage, Stone Town is also a major visitor attraction in Tanzania, and a large part of its economy depends on tourism-related activities.

Written by enfoquec on January 7th, 2011

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Ben Youssef Madrasa   no comments

photo and text from wikipedia

Ben Youssef MadrasaBen Youssef Madrasa

The Ben Youssef Madrasa was an Islamic college in Marrakech, Morocco, named after the amoravid sultan Ali ibn Yusuf (reigned 1106–1142), who expanded the city and its influence considerably. It is the largest Medrasa in all of Morocco.

The college was founded during the period of the Marinid (14th century) by the Marinid sultan Abu al-Hassan and allied to the neighbouring Ben Youssef Mosque. The building of the madrasa was re-constructed by the Saadian Sultan Abdallah al-Ghalib (1557–1574). In 1565 the works ordered by Abdallah al-Ghalib were finished, as confirmed by the inscription in the prayer room. Its 130 student dormitory cells cluster around a courtyard richly carved in cedar, marble and stucco. The carvings contain no representation of humans or animals as required by Islam, and consist entirely of inscriptions and geometric patterns. This madrasa was one of the largest theological colleges in North Africa and may have housed as many as 900 students. One of its best known teachers was Mohammed al-Ifrani (1670-1745).

Closed down in 1960, the building was refurbished and reopened to the public as an historical site in 1982.

Written by enfoquec on January 5th, 2011

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